Little Big Burger (SE Portland Location)

Posted: January 3, 2013 in B^4
Tags: , , ,


LBB fries

Little Big Burger

There are two obvious interpretations of the name:

1) Little or Big burger – your choice.

2) Little burger, Big flavor.

When I saw one was opening near my best friend’s house on SE Division Street, I knew a trip there was in my future. My interpretation, without seeing the menu, was 1), but after said friend made a trek there, he confirmed that the intent is 2). There’s an LBB in all 5 quadrants of Portland proper, so you shouldn’t have to go to far, wherever you’re located.

Once I finally saw the sprawling menu (you can see it on the homepage), it seemed like LBB was channeling it’s inner In-n-Out – keep it simple and straightforward. Fine by me, so long as the burger is good! I actually didn’t mind at this particular moment that the burger wouldn’t be huge – it was already pushing 2:30 PM, and I had plans to cook dinner on this particular evening.

I ordered a cheeseburger ($3.75) with chevre, and an order of fries ($2.75). Note there are milkshakes here, but there is a root beer float, as well as a good [canned/bottled] beer selection that’s not mentioned on the online menu.

Unsurprisingly, this is an order-at-the-counter establishment, so we ordered, then sat ourselves at one of the few tables inside. You’ll notice LBB is a decent takeout option.

When I went up to the counter to get my burger, the first thought I had was, yes, it’s little. If I didn’t know what to expect, yeah, I might’ve felt a little let down. But really, it’s just my mind playing a trick on me. A 1/4 lb. burger isn’t all that uncommon – it’s just usually served as a thin patty to cover more surface area. But that often makes for a flimsy dry patty (think typical fast food – those are usually flimsy 1/4 lb. patties). So the way LBB serves the burger, you’re going to get less “bites” (but they’ll be much higher quality, if the patty is cooked correctly).

And boy am I happy to say, the burger was cooked to perfection. Juice oozed out with every bite, and any letdown I felt was immediately replaced with umami. And the x-factor of this burger must not be left out, either. The chevre was a neat twist – not only did it add a nice creaminess, it also mixed really well with the burger as a whole, and gave the burger a bit more depth than your standard cheddar or jack cheese.

The compactness of the burger also forced me to take smaller bites, which led to me eating slower (and savoring each bite more), which led to me feeling fuller – really not a bad thing at all. The “little” burger served here is actually a great idea; however, I think the business just needs to make their product a bit more known to passersby, so that there isn’t that confusion of “wait, that’s it?” Our brains are powerful entities!

That said, I don’t see why the option of a double cheeseburger isn’t on the menu – doesn’t seem like an unreasonable request. But honestly, if you’re OK with getting a double cheeseburger, what’s a few more carbs in that second bun? 🙂

And just so we’re clear:

LBB patty = 1/4 lb.

In-n-Out Double-double (2 patties) = 1/4 lb.

LBB fries

 

I’m not so sure about the fries ($2.75). It may have just been my experience, but something tasted a little bit off. The fries are served with one of the era’s most polarizing ingredients – truffle oil. I’m not a huge proponent of truffle oil (a bias which may have something to do with my enjoyment of Anthony Bourdain’s writings + No Reservations (see Croatia episode) – he hates it); to me it’s fine, but I don’t really see why it’s a necessary addition to food. My preferred encounter with truffle oil is as a component of a truffle mayo or aioli…

But yes, the fries, something was awry here. I’m not sure if the frying oil was burnt, or if the fries were just overcooked, but something was a bit off – a bit disconcerting. Unfortunately, that wasn’t it; rather, another battle was taking place. The truffle oil and the house ketchup (Camden’s Catsup), didn’t mix well on the palate. The strong, earthy truffle taste was fighting the bold spices in the ketchup, and the result just amplified that burnt sensation, and I eventually just finished the fries without ketchup, and then just ate some of the ketchup. There’s the start of something good here, but the flaws stood out to me, here. That said, the portion size is huge, so you’re probably pretty safe splitting an order of fries, especially if you’re not sure about going for a second burger (you can haz, and you should haz more cheezburger, in case you were wondering). Cost of two cheeseburgers (yes, that’s half a pound) and half an order of fries? Under $9.

As a side note, Camden’s Catsup is really good – spicy, and not overly sweet – definitely a far cry from your standard Heinz Ketchup. But the flavors are really bold, so you don’t need too much of it for the full effect. And as I just mentioned above, it perhaps doesn’t mix as straightforwardly with other flavor combinations as does generic ketchup.

Even as we were headed out the door, I strongly toyed with the idea of getting another burger for the road, but it was a late lunch (almost 3PM at this point), and I figured I’d enjoy my satisfied-but-not-overfull state of being.

My main advice would just be to know what the restaurant name means ahead of time, and you won’t feel “let down” by what you’re served. That’s all mental – if you get past that, you’re going to find a really juicy, flavorful burger. The name Little Big Burger is definitely true – it’s a little burger with big flavor. I just wish they’d make that connotation a bit more obvious to those not in the know.

Will definitely go back, even if for a afternoon snack!

The Last Bite:

Burger Rating: B+

Overall Experience (sides, service, cleanliness, price, etc.): B

Keep on nomming!

 

 
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